Dec 282007
 

Poco’s closed to the public on March 16 but has since reopened. This review reflects my experience at the first incarnation.

Everyone wants to love this place, and it’s easy to see why. The owner works in the kitchen, the staff is very friendly. The space is cute, and the location is off-kilter enough to make it interesting. It’s hard to argue with all that.

I visited during lunch hour and found the place nearly devoid of customers, but I think Poco’s does a better breakfast trade anyway. It’s interesting to see such a combination of American and Latin cuisine, but not in the same dishes, just on the same menu. The menu features both American classics and gussied-up Mexican fare. For instance, at breakfast you can get huevos rancheros or pancakes with sausage. For lunch you can have fish tacos or a cheeseburger. Great, something for everyone, right? But as I sat there with my menu, I found myself wondering: Do I really want a reuben from a Mexican restaurant? Do I really want tacos at an American restaurant?

I want to know what they do best, and that’s my responsibility as a diner and a lackadaisical blogger. I figured, let’s go with the mole. Mole is pure Mexico, and not every Mexican place has it on the menu. Not unlike barbeque sauce or marinara, there are different types and techniques with everyone claiming to have to best version of this revered sauce. And it is notoriously difficult to make from scratch. Now I’ve had mole in various incarnations at many Mexican restaurants. I have even foolishly attempted to make mole in my own home–the kitchen looked like a crime scene when it was all over. Alas the mole at Poco’s had all the indications of being made from a commonly available paste, and I can’t really blame them. Tasty, but pedestrian. It came atop chunks of poached chicken breast-certainly not a traditional implementation. It was satisfying but underwhelming. With decent corn tortillas, refried beans and excellent rice, it was nonetheless worth 7.95.

Due to this, I think I might just try breakfast fare next time. It doesn’t seem like they are trying too hard with that and other people’s food looked tasty. Poco’s does offer a nice selection of beer to take the edge off a morning’s hard work. The place has windows all around the perimeter which invites great natural light and a vista of industrial KCK in all its glory. As a lunch spot, you can probably do better for Mexican on the Boulevard. But if you have a hankering for breakfast food, or just want a friendly change of pace, it’s a bit of allright.

Don’t want to take my word for it? here are some other reviews from

Poco's on the Boulevard on Urbanspoon

Cooking in KC

The Pitch

and Noodletown

  6 Responses to “Poco’s: 3063 Southwest Boulevard – CLOSED”

  1. From the street, this looks like the best place in town. I really need to stop driving by…

  2. we thoroughly enjoy breakfast at pocos on the blvd….first time for lunch there today(soon) fyi as u no doubt have recognized by now…pocos is not in kansas

  3. Born in California, I am picky about Mexican food, not just anything will do. Pocos is extremely authentic and modern at the same time!, well made and delicious. They offer American food too for those friends and family that need something ordinary. We have breakfast there every weekend!!!

  4. I believe Poco's is re-opening soon. The sign out front mentions some sort of buffet. Not sure if it's the same gal or family, but looks like the name is staying.

  5. Yes PV, they are apparently re-opening. Fat City posted about it yesterday. Something seems weird about the whole thing but I can't put my finger on it. I guess we'll have to stop in and see what it's like now.

  6. Now open!